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So how did Sonic Farm gear work for you?
If you are a Sonic Farm user, please leave feedback on this page.
Even better, send us some audio files recorded through our gear!

  • http://flamencocoast.com Rod Malkin

    Fantastic Pre!!!!… I bought 4 channels of Creamer for recording primarily, acoustic Flamenco and Jazz following a test conducted at my studio….

    The major test was for flamenco guitar, my instrument. I tested the Creamer against my other 6 pres and a few more borrowed units … The test included BAE 1073, Millenia STT, Forssell, Gordon, Avalon 737, LA610, Portico 5032, Lafont, Aphex 1100. The signal chain was: Ramirez flamenco guitar, km184, pre, Apogee 16x converters, Logic, Genelecs 1032’s. The Creamer was astonishing and best!… an amazing combination of clarity, depth, quickness, agility with complex staccato, exquisitely detailed character, warmth, delicate or passionate expression, etc. etc. while staying big and present!!! Actually, when I first compared it with my previous favourite pre, I thought something was wrong with the equipment to make the previous favourite sound not quite right… The creamer sounded so natural and big, the way all pres should sound… And not coloured, I don’t know why you guys call it “Creamer” which implies a colouring ,rather than what the Creamer gives, just what the mind hears… Bravo!!

    Also, tried with bass, and never heard anything that musical and ‘right’ Wow… On voice, it was the same, but I’m not sure I would necessarily call it ‘best’ as all the pres give something different depending on what the singer/producer needs/wants… The Creamer is there, again, as described above, natural, big, detailed, warm beautiful … Wow!!

    Ole to Sonic Farm!!

    Rod Malkin

  • http://Pacificav.com Ken Burke

    Hello,

    If you are going to only use one pre-amp, this would be the one to own.

    It sounds simply fantastic. It is very versatile. You can have colour, or not depending on the settings. It also gets along well with my vintage microphones. I have used this now on string sections, drummers, guitar players (lots of headroom), vocals, and Hammond. It outperforms all of my classic and other boutique pre amps. I think the price point is actually very fair, condsidering the QUALITY parts and workmanship involved. Oh, I almost forgot, I have started to run mixes through this thing. That was revealing for me. I urge you to try it out.

    Great work guys and thanks for the personal service.

    Ken Burke
    Multi gold and platinum recording engineer.

  • http://maximussound.com Claude Laforest

    When I purchase a piece of outboard gear, or plug-in for that matter, I’m looking for
    an investment to have an impact, to make a difference in the recordings I do.

    So when I acquired the SONIC FARM Creamer Plus on trial I was looking for the impact that this mic pre would have on the recordings here at MAXIMUS SOUND. I am working with a client on a variety of acoustic rock songs as we compile a collection for an album to be released mid-June. His favorite mic pre (cause he owns it), and one of mine too is the UA 6176. We have used this and a variety of other mic-pres and other gear from my collection so we were happy to try the CREAMER PLUS.

    The first tracks recorded through the CREAMER PLUS was a Larivee acoustic. The signal chain was an ADVANCED AUDIO CM-12 to the CREAMER PLUS to my vintage 1176 to PT HD. In addition to the miked track we also had the opportunity to send the DI path through the SONIC FARM JE-DI . Let me just say that the DI track is exceptional and that piece of gear is going on my list of must have items for the studio.

    The track sounded clean, warm with a sonic clarity that was well balanced that impressed all of us at the session. We added another acoustic guitar track using my Martin ™ Koa which has a bit more bottom end. Using the AIR filters and the HPF created and exceptional sound that worked very well with the Larivee tracks.

    We then moved onto recording mandolin. Two different sounds were recorded, one was a lazy strum to accompany the acoustic guitars and a second track of a picking sound. In both situations tracks were wonderfully rounded, warm and sat very well in the mix without extensive manipulation. The signal path was the same as the acoustic guitars with the exception of the picking mandolin which a Advanced Audio CM 414 was used instead of the CM-12.

    Onto Bass guitar, a Hofner Beatle Bass. The DI on the CREAMER PLUS was put to use for this track . The FAT EQ switch was engaged and provided all the necessary warmth and clarity we needed to support the tracks. Again with little need to alter the sound provided by the SONIC FARM CREAMER PLUS we were able to achieve the desired sound for the song.

    We then moved on to the final “test” for the CREAMER PLUS. VOCALS, again using the AA CM-12. The initial test was done by recording the first verse of the song just to see if we’d be happy with the sound or need to move to another mic pre on the next session.
    WOW, seems totally inadequate to describe the result. Again the track just sat perfectly in the mix and confirmed that we wouldn’t need to change a thing for the upcoming vocal sessions.

    Essentially the whole song was produced using the CREAMER PLUS . I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a bit of CREAMER added to everything on this album. Boris and Zoran have a real winner on their hands and I recommend their products to anyone who is serious about creating rich flavorful music. BTW The CREAMER Plus has been added to the Maximus Sound collection.
    THANK YOU SONIC FARM!

    Claude Laforest, Owner of MAXIMUS SOUND

  • Tarek Eineweihi

    The Creamer Plus is simply an amazing sounding pre. I was impressed with the sound from the get-go. What I quickly discovered though is that the sound I first heard was just one of many possible sounds that this unit is capable of. The unit is in fact not just one pair of pres, but is actually more like having at least 4 different sounding pairs of pres in one box…possibly more. Each channel gives you the option of switching between solid state transformer-less output and going through the output transformer (in my case I ordered a unit with iron transformers). Additionally, being a tube amp, one has the option of switching between triode and pentode mode. The differences in tone were not subtle. It was literally as though each setting gave me a completely different sounding pre.
    The impedance switch allows one to switch between low, medium and high impedances. It also has an “air” switch with two options for adding that sweet top end to your sound, as well as a “fat” switch which again has two different options for adding low frequency and girth. Again, every time I switched between any of these options, I got a very different sound. Not subtle at all.

    I was looking for a pre that would rival my BAE 1073MP in tone as well as offer other tonal options. This is exactly what I got with the Creamer Plus. I tested it against the BAE and against my APIs. While each has it’s own character, I found that I could come quite close to the sound of the other two pres by adjusting settings on the Creamer Plus. In fact, shortly after doing those tests I put my BAE up for sale. Not that the BAE is in any way a lacking pre, in fact I’d say just the opposite, but I simply didn’t need it any more since the Creamer plus was able to come close enough to the tonal characteristics I learned to love in the BAE. And, in some applications where I would normally be looking for that “Neve-like” sound, I felt that the Creamer actually out-shined the BAE.

    Because of the myriad of different tones available with the Creamer, it is hard to give an overall description of its sound. However, I can say that consistently, no matter what setting I use, the Creamer sounds very “big” and “open” in comparison to other classic pres, and it has a very balanced frequency spectrum (which of course can be adjusted with the different settings). In “transformer mode” I am able to get the “vintage pre” tone that I love in so many of the classic pres, and when I switch to solid state mode I am able to achieve the transparency that I sometimes desire, particularly when recording acoustic instruments.

    The Creamer shines on vocals and acoustic guitars for sure. In fact, it is now my go to pre for those applications. Another great thing about it is that it is set up nicely to run software-generated tracks through it to add some warmth and size, and running mixes through it also produces great results. I am not usually in the practice of running mixes through pres, but the results I got from the Creamer may just end up steering me in that direction.

    Because I primarily track overdubs and mix, the Creamer is a perfect tool for me. With the purchase of one unit I was able to get the equivalent of 4 pairs of different sounding pres, and save my money and rack-space for other things such as outboard compressors and EQs.

    Lastly, I have to mention that the support that I have received from Zoran and Boris, the creators of the Creamer Plus, has been absolutely amazing. Both guys are great to deal with, and happy to take the time to explain the concepts behind the design of this pre, as well as suggest settings and different applications for the unit.

    In sum, I am very excited about my new purchase. I thought I’d share my excitement with others because for those of you out there who have similar studio setups, I think that you’ll find that the Creamer Plus will definitely be an asset, and may actually save you money in the long run.

    Tarek Eineweihi, Crippled Sound, Vancouver

  • http://www.liquidtensionmusic.com/ Liquid Tension Music

    Our U87 never sounded so good on vocals until we put it through the Creamer Plus (C+). We are so impressed by its big and open sound, extremely large headroom and the versatility in tone adjustments. C+ does exactly a truly great pre should do – capturing the sound as your ears hear it. Running mixes or stems through the line input to add warmth also produces excellent result. We are also grateful for the support and instruction given by Zoran and Boris during the test session. They love what they do and stand behind their belief. As excellent musicians and engineers themselves, they know what sounds great and how to deliver the result with their product.

    Junshuo Hou and Jiefu Wang

    Liquid Tension Music

  • Tarek Eineweihi

    The Creamer Plus is simply an amazing sounding pre. I was impressed with the sound from the get-go. What I quickly discovered though is that the sound I first heard was just one of many possible sounds that this unit is capable of. The unit is in fact not just one pair of pres, but is actually more like having at least 4 different sounding pairs of pres in one box…possibly more. 

    Each channel gives you the option of switching between solid state transformer-less output and going through the output transformer (in my case I ordered a unit with iron transformers). Additionally, being a tube amp, one has the option of switching between triode and pentode mode. The differences in tone were not subtle. It was literally as though each setting gave me a completely different sounding pre.

    The impedance switch allows one to switch between low, medium and high impedances. It also has an “air” switch with two options for adding that sweet top end to your sound, as well as a “fat” switch which again has two different options for adding low frequency and girth. Again, every time I switched between any of these options, I got a very different sound. Not subtle at all.

    I was looking for a pre that would rival my BAE 1073MP in tone as well as offer other tonal options. This is exactly what I got with the Creamer Plus. I tested it against the BAE and against my APIs. While each has it’s own character, I found that I could come quite close to the sound of the other two pres by adjusting settings on the Creamer Plus. In fact, shortly after doing those tests I put my BAE up for sale. Not that the BAE is in any way a lacking pre, in fact I’d say just the opposite, but I simply didn’t need it any more since the Creamer plus was able to come close enough to the tonal characteristics I learned to love in the BAE. And, in some applications where I would normally be looking for that “Neve-like” sound, I felt that the Creamer actually out-shined the BAE.

    Because of the myriad of different tones available with the Creamer, it is hard to give an overall description of its sound. However, I can say that consistently, no matter what setting I use, the Creamer sounds very “big” and “open” in comparison to other classic pres, and it has a very balanced frequency spectrum (which of course can be adjusted with the different settings). In “transformer mode” I am able to get the “vintage pre” tone that I love in so many of the classic pres, and when I switch to solid state mode I am able to achieve the transparency that I sometimes desire, particularly when recording acoustic instruments.

    The Creamer shines on vocals and acoustic guitars for sure. In fact, it is now my go to pre for those applications. Another great thing about it is that it is set up nicely to run software-generated tracks through it to add some warmth and size, and running mixes through it also produces great results. I am not usually in the practice of running mixes through pres, but the results I got from the Creamer may just end up steering me in that direction.

    Because I primarily track overdubs and mix, the Creamer is a perfect tool for me. With the purchase of one unit I was able to get the equivalent of 4 pairs of different sounding pres, and save my money and rack-space for other things such as outboard compressors and EQs.

    Lastly, I have to mention that the support that I have received from Zoran and Boris, the creators of the Creamer Plus, has been absolutely amazing. Both guys are great to deal with, and happy to take the time to explain the concepts behind the design of this pre, as well as suggest settings and different applications for the unit.

    In sum, I am very excited about my new purchase. I thought I’d share my excitement with others because for those of you out there who have similar studio setups, I think that you’ll find that the Creamer Plus will definitely be an asset, and may actually save you money in the long run.

  • Ben Huntus

    Here is my review on the Creamer Plus:

    I only used four mics and never gotten bigger drum sound. I use the Glyn Johns OVH set up with M-160s, a 57 on the snare, and fet47 on the kick and That’s all I needed, will ever need.
    Please hear for yourself:
    http://youtu.be/t-PTa5fuMB0

    Ben Huntus

  • Bubba

    Your equipment sux

  • http://www.facebook.com/CameronHood Cameron Hood

       I just took delivery of the Je-DI and am completely enthralled with it. I own a smattering of high end tube gear by some other famous boutique companies, and these new products by Sonic Farm are absolutely world class, right up there with the finest stuff currently being made. As an electric bassist for over 42 years, I’ve owned dozens of amps of all descriptions, tube gear, rack mount, solid state, everything, and have played through hundreds of others. I have recorded in many major and a lot of minor studios in Vancouver, direct-in through boards and channel strips from little Mackies and the like to vintage Neves, SSL’s, and API’s. Over the years, I’ve auditioned dozens of preamps and channel strips for my own boutique bass rig, bass preamps from bass companies like Aguilar, Alembic, Trace-Elliot, Eden, Ampeg, and SWR, to high end recording strips from API, Millennia, Rupert Neve, Universal Audio, Summit Audio, and many others. I’ve even auditioned a slate of high and medium priced DI’s from Millennia, A Designs (Reddi), Summit Audio, Ampeg, and others.

        The Je-DI has unique sounds and features that distinguish it from all the rest – the preset EQ switches give you a variety of customizable sounds, the triode/pentode mode switch goes from a nice warm tube sound to a very hot and saturated one, still very hi-fi, without a hint of distortion (it just sounds so HOT in Pentode mode), or you can dial up distortion from mild to crazy with it. The headroom on this unit is unsurpassed, as good or better than the finest preamps on earth. My six-string Michael Tobias Design basses, with their on-board 18 volt preamp, can tax and exceed the outer limits of pretty much ANY system out there. The Je-DI handles the HUGE dynamics and transients of these hand-made basses in stride, and the pentode tube that Sonic Farm uses yields a distinctive top end and red-hot tubey deliciousness that NO other preamp or DI can produce.

        There are LOTS of great preamps and DI’s out there, but none of them sound as rich and unique as this one from Sonic Farm. I’ll be posting some sound clips up here as soon as I get something worthwhile, and hope to help these guys spread the word about the audio magic that they are creating. I’ll also be using it at all my festival gigs this summer, so if you hear me at one, you’ll be hearing the Je-DI as well.

    Thanks so much, Boris and Zoran! This thing sounds amazing!

    More to come…

    Sincerely,
    Cameron Hood

  • Rob Bailey

    Hello, everyone.

    It was my distinct pleasure to take delivery of the very first Creamer Plus.  Boris actually called me out of the blue and offered to come to my little studio on Bowen Island and do a demo of the Creamer, and after we did a little shootout with my other preamps in the studio, my jaw was on the floor!  The Creamer is simply the most tonally versatile preamp I have ever heard.
     
    Using it to record upright bass was a transformative experience, but after running my newly-modified Advanced Audio mics through it, I was finally able to get the best vocal sound I have ever recorded!  No EQ.  No compression.  Just pure wonderfulness…

    I do a fair bit of mastering in my studio, and when I had the opportunity to master the new disc by the Teun Schut jazz trio (Teun Schut, Rene Worst, and Buff Allen), I thought I would put the stereo “mixed in the box” mixes through the Creamer line inputs.   What came out the other end blew me (and my clients) away.  The Creamer acted like a giant “MORE” knob, and added warmth and high end detail to the digital mix.  It was both subtle and incredibly noticeable all at the same time.

    I really can’t say enough good stuff about Sonic Farm and the Creamer.  I’ve recommended this unit to friends who have also bought them and been equally impressed.   I love companies like this.  Ones that are driven by passion and commitment to excellence rather than being purely motivated by profit.  If they were, the Creamer would sell for three times the price!  It is officially my “go-to” device for just about everything.  If Boris figures out how to get 8 of these things into a lunchbox, I’m doomed…  :-)

    Thanks so much for pouring your heart and soul into this thing! 

  • guest

    just curious as to whether you got the iron or steel transformers?

  • ztjangle

    Hi,
    There is actually no difference between iron and steel output transformers. What is meant is that there is no Nickel present in the transformer cores. I guess you can call it steel.
    So that’s what their Creamer+ has. The other option would be Ni+Fe alloy. Pure Nickel also exists as core material, but to our ears it sounds just like transformerless output, hence we don’t offer it.

  • guest

    great thanks!

  • Michael Holland

    Hi folks!  I’m a producer/engineer and independent recording artist/writer, and I work from home in West Vancouver BC.  I tried the Creamer Plus on various sources and sessions, and WOW, what a fantastic sound.  I own four Neve 1073s (2 x 19″ units and 2 x 500-series units), plus an Avalon VT-737sp as well as numerous UA and Sony preamps,   The Creamer Plus had no problem standing against such esteemed competition.  The Creamer Plus proved to be warm, big, bold and beautiful – and subtle too when necessary, but truly excellent for making things sound larger than life.  I have also owned and loved the Sonic Farm DI box for a while now – this thing is the BEST DI box I have, and I’ve got nine other DI boxes to compare it with, including the omnipresent Radial units.  I’ll repeat it – the Sonic Farm DI rules them all.  Thanks, Sonic Farm!  It’s obvious you guys love music and sound as much as I do, which is a rare thing!

  • Richard

    I’ve had the Creamer for quite a while now… and to say that I LOVE IT
    is a huge understatement. It is, simply put, the most used and most
    prized piece of gear in my studio. The amount of times it’s been used, and the sheer quality of
    audio that it produces makes it the best preamp I own and have used.
    Hands down.

    It’s able to capture the sounds as your ears hear them. Maybe even
    slightly better. It’s just one of those things that when you hear it
    come out of the Creamer, you crack a little smile, and say to yourself,
    “Yup… that’s awesome.” It’s so warm and clean, and the headroom you
    get with it is unsurpassed. I can’t say enough good things about it.
    And that’s what happens when two brilliant minds who are passionate
    about audio come together to create. You get something like the Creamer.

    The same goes for the 2DI4.  .  After using the Creamer for so long, I just came to expect the same sort of attention to detail, quality of build, and versatility from their 2DI4.  I was not let down at all.  It’s the sort of thing that gets used without hesitation on any bass session I have.  I haven’t had it long enough to test it out on other applications, but I look forward to putting it through its paces. 

    Cheers Boris and Zoran,
    You make the audio-gods proud…

    Richard Vandop
    SheerSound Studios

  • Peter Davyduck

    My first experience with Sonic Farm was on a small session where the engineer and producer said
    hey, we’re wanting to try out this new preamp, it’s called the Creamer and this is Boris, one of the guys who designed and built it…. is it cool if we put your bass through it?” Of course I said yes, I’m just as much a gear junkie as the next. Well, there’s always something right, guttural, sits in the mix best, inspiring about the sound of a Fender P-Bass, except this time I was hearing my bass and nuance in the tone like I never had. It was a classic example of plugging into anything can work and the public won’t be the wiser BUT when, as a musician, you use gear that goes above and beyond what you’re used to and reaches that place of giving you tone that inspires you, well, that’s something you CAN’T put a price tag on. NO compression, NO eq, just me, myself, and my P Bass straight to hard disk in such an inspiring tone that my neck above the 9th fret has never sounded so musical. It lead to me commenting that as a bassist, it would be amazing if they could take what the Creamer does and put it into a DI box………Boris listened and yes they did stuff all the goodness inside, and it’s called the 2di 4, and it IS to die for. ;)

    Ever since that chance session/meeting with Boris and getting acquainted with Sonic Farm and the sonic architects that they are my tone and expression through my instrument has not been the same.

    The magick that resides in the triode/pentode switch alone is worth the price of admission.

    Do yourself a favor and seek them out, be the first one on the block to say you were in on it before it went huge! :)

  • Zoran

    The DI box name has been changed from Je-DI to 2di4 because of legal reasons.

  • Jesse Gander

    Used the Creamer+ on drum overheads for the new Nautical Miles record and got some of the most detailed cymbal recording I’ve made. A pair of akg 451’s and a spot mic on the kick and snare was all that was needed. Great transient response combined and a solid low end made the drums sound controlled without sounding compressed. 
    The Je-DI also delivered on the bass guitar. I’m not usually a Di man, as I often prefer the warmth of an amp, but with Je-DI the DI track sounded full and thick. Sat really well in the mix too. 
    Congrats on two great products! 

  • Erik Zobler

    I used the Creamer on various drum recordings (witha Sure 57 on snare and an AKG 452 on Hat) for George Duke’s new album (currently in mastering) and was very happy with the results.  I also used it for Background vocals with an AKG C-12.  Lovely.  It also worked great on direct guitar to impart a little extra “something!” — I put int in Pentode mode and “pushed it” a little to give the direct sound a bit more character than the simple clean direct sound.  It was still clean, but fit the track better than some of my other di/preamps.

  • Chris Rabold

    Can’t say enough good things about the Creamliner. I’ve used all of the “glue-it-together, thicken-it-up” stuff out there when mixing live. By the time most of those products do their thing you’re left with a mess in the low mids. The Creamliner does EXACTLY what you ask it do; impart life, lift and color. What it does not do is muck up the frequency spectrum in damaging way. Meeting the fine gentleman at Sonic Farm was an absolute godsend. I have been looking for something that does what the Creamliner does for years. A+ across the board.

  • Cor Curtis

    I am an electric bass player that just got back from a 5 weeks tour across Canada and the USA; the JE-DI was by my side the whole tour and every tech from every venue was really really impressed with it’s tone.  There were even a few guys that had heard of Sonic Farm!  This DI is a great piece of gear and I’m sure glad I found it.  

  • Mike Maxwell

    I’ve owned and used the
    Creamer Plus for about a year, and could not be happier with it. 
    It is my go-to pre-amp for a stereo drum overhead image, which to me
    is the litmus test for a high quality pre-amplifier.  Having
    used other legendary pre-amps such as API, Neve, SSL and many others,
    this device holds its own and then some.  Having learned what it
    can do, I usually prefer the Creamer to any of the aforementioned
    (with the possible exception of the API in certain applications),
    though this is a matter of taste, subjectivity and in some degree
    familiarity.  It does well on anything though and shines
    particularly on vocals or acoustic guitar as well as drum overheads,
    where the upper harmonics are so crucial.  One thing that I love
    about the Creamer is its versatility.  With many combinations of
    impedance and tubes, there is nothing that it doesn’t do well, and
    much that it excels at, though it took some time to learn exactly
    what I like best to use it on.  Particularly suited to ribbon
    mics, it has enough gain to satisfy the gain-appetite of even the
    hungriest ribbon mic.  My unit is equipped with the 100% Iron
    transformers and although I have used the Nickel-Iron alloy core
    transformer version only once, it too yielded a very sweet tone.I
    knew I wanted the Creamer, but decided to spring for the Creamer
    Plus, as I do at least as much mixing as tracking.  The Creamer
    Plus puts a very pleasant stamp on your 2-bus and even in some cases
    might warrant running some stems through.  Again, there is more
    than just one sound available with the possibility of using Pentode
    or Triode tubes with either solid state or output transformer mode. 
    In general, from what I can hear of the difference, the unit seems to
    suck out a bit of the low-mid range, perhaps the 3rd harmonic of a
    bass guitar, and adds some very subtle and pleasing low-level
    harmonic distortion to the signal.  The qualitative difference
    could be described as follows: the Creamer Plus throws in to slightly
    greater relief some of those details that might have seemed a bit
    “cloudy” before in the mix, if that makes any sense at
    all.  I am fairly aggressive with pulling out the low-mids
    myself, due to working on mainly heavy music; so I have, to some
    small degree, modified my approach to treating certain instruments
    and frequency bands (i.e. 180 Hz-ish), if I think that the project
    warrants running the final mix though my Creamer Plus.  It
    usually does.  I understand there is now a standalone version of
    this “line mixer” capability the Creamer Plus offers, and I
    can hear why it has been so well received.  If you try it,
    chances are you will too.  When I A/B-ed a recent mix through
    the Creamer Plus for my production partner, he said “I wish I
    had one of those just for my stereo”.  Well, apparently now
    that is a possibility.It excels as a pre-amplifier, and is
    invaluable as a mixing and mastering tool.  The Creamer Plus
    would be a good deal at a much higher price than it currently goes
    for.I have also had some limited experience using the Je-DI
    (now called 2DI4) on projects, and from what I have tried, it is one of the best DI
    units around.  It yields a warm and detailed tone, and is of
    course perfect for bass guitar.  One of my favourite
    applications for it is to use it in combination with an NS-10 speaker
    cone to record a kick drum.  This seems like an embarrassment of
    riches, especially when running it through the Creamer pre-amp. 
    I have not used the 2DI4 extensively, though I hope to do so in the
    future.I’m very interested in what Sonic Farm has coming down
    the pipe, as all of the products of theirs I have tried have been
    nothing if not the highest quality, and best priced among audio
    equipment of similar stature.

    Mike Maxwell

  • John Raham

    The Creamer + is truly a great piece. . Often winning out over my neve’s and v76 for overheads. It is also my go to preamp for most piano tracking and pitched percussion. I can also say that Boris has been extremely helpful and responsive with support. He’s swapped transformers for me to get a more detailed sound and customized the eq section to my liking.

  • Devin Turner

    I used to Creamer Plus while recording Viola and various percussive instruments. The sound was unbelievable! It brought such a great quality to the recording and was incredibly versatile.
    The ‘air’ switch added the perfect amount of high frequency and both the Triode and Pentode modes sound excellent.

  • http://twitter.com/resonantmind Resonant Mind

    My session recording with Spectres was one of the best sessions I’ve had, and the Creamer Plus and 2DI4 were without a doubt, a big part of that.

    I look for tools that are unique and inspiring to use and hear, both for myself and the client – the Creamer Plus and 2DI4 provided Spectres and I with exactly that – an inspiring and awesome sound beyond our expectations. Both products really diversified our sonic pallet for the project in a way I can’t explain other than by saying, it brought us a new-vintage sound that also seemed more than capable of competing in the modern high-end recording arena – it had all the vintage vibe but without sounding dated or similar to current rehashed “clone” type gear on the market. Everything sounded killer through this box, and the drums turned out amazing with the creamer as the Drum Overhead Mic pres. The DI gave me one of the best bass sounds I’ve ever obtained.
    Peter

  • briguy 1960

    To get the most out of my comments I would suggest you read the Creamer+ instruction manual first as I refer to several features which are not found on standard preamps. This is part of the charm(and the challenge) of this very cool sound tool.

    I have had the Creamer + for a few tracking sessions now and I have tracked Bass, acoustic guitar, lap steel and vocals with the unit. Boris was extremely helpful in giving me some pointers, and the manual is very well written.

    One thing I like to do with instruments is to use an external DI and by doing so you can mic the instrument and/or use the the thru of the DI to the 2nd channel using the front instrument but, the xlr DI output can go into the #1 mic input of the creamer and you can avail yourself of all the tone shaping options available with the creamer +.

    My main bass is a Music Man and I have never been able to get the bass sound I hear in my head until now. Bass into Radial JDI, into the mic input on the Creamer. With the four different basic options AND the Air and Fat I was able to get the best bass sound ever. that sat in the track with NO eq and minimal compression.

    Same sort of idea with acoustic guitar. With my Rainsong guitar I again Di’d the piezo output and then into channel 1. Channel 2 at the 12th fret with an AT 4050. Using a pair of senn HD 280s I tried all the various combo’s finally going pentode/ OT on the piezo and Pentode/ SS on the mic. Adding Fat 1 and Air 2 to the mic and the piezo flat. I keep a small slot screwdriver on hand to tweak the trimpots although the mid position is a good starting point. The final sound is very easy to place into the mix and again just “sits” right. Same approach applied to a lap steel track but amping and micing into channel two.

    For vocals my go to mic lately is the sm7b. Relatively inexpensive and with low output it nonetheless seem to work on many voices. My first step up from stock box pre’s was the FMR RNP which sounded ok but was pretty noisy. Prior to the Creamer + my other outboard pre’s were the Aphex 230 and the Portico 5012. The Neve is definitely nice and a great complementary pre to have along with the Creamer. Both have good quiet gain which is needed for the SM7b. Even using triode/ss settings there was no problem getting enough clean quiet gain. Again you will need to listen to the song, the singer and the mic to find the right settings.

    While the Neve basically has a two variables,SILK and Bass rolloff, there are many more options with the Creamer+. Ahhhh choices

    As a person who has been recording since a TEAC 3440 was cutting edge for a home studio and who records mostly singer/songwriters and projects for myself and the various projects I play with , I thought long and hard about what is a significant purchase for my personal studio. I can say without hesitation, there is no buyers remorse. Life is short. When trying to make good recordings one piece of gear is not going to compensate for lousy room acoustics/instruments/performances but I can say that everything I have tracked through this box sounds as good or better than anything I have done previously. The build quality is top notch. The unit is DEAD quiet. The sonic variables are powerful. I am very happy with the purchase of my Creamer+

    Final thoughts:

    While individual tracks sound great, the real joy was when I started to mix. I found myself using less eq and compression and yet it seemed easier to get a coherent mix together. I have yet to try strapping it across a final mix but I understand it can really l help put that final touch on a final mix. When I get to that I will report back.

    Brian

  • Preference Mastering

    I’ve always thought about a one-of-a-kind line amplifier consisting of very high-end components featuring superb tubes and great transformers, in which the cleverly thought of circuitry design purposely leads to a refined coloration! And it would be used before entering the A/D converter as an extremely precisely controlled coloration device.
    When I heard about Sonic Farm and their Creamliner, I was very curious to hear it, as it could suits my needs.

    After a month, I can say I almost use it all the time, it’s definitely beautiful on 2-bus; I’m quite impressed by the results. The sound still stays very pure on both channels with no phase shift (I had tons of them with other mastering tube compressors, especially on the low-end…) but with that subtly compressed sound and deep creamy flavour I like with tube and transformer devices. It complements my VCA compressor perfectly.

    I tend to prefer the Pentode mode on well produced tracks to enhance thickness. The Triode mode is perfect when I need a tight and pithy sound.
    When output though the Cinemag transformers (pure Steel ones in my unit, you also can ask for cleaner Ni/Fe transformers), the difference is quite subtle depending of the music, but sometimes it adds a magic “3D” feeling. Those are doing something beautiful on transients: music becomes less boring and more alive.

    The FAT and AIR switches alter the frequency response of the tube stage and are great options to add colours to the palette. They react differently under Triode and Pentode mode and sometimes are the perfect “organic” and natural sounding alternative to regular shelf EQ-ing.

    Charles Michaud / Preference Mastering

  • Kris Siegers

    I had the pleasure of using The Creamer, the Silkworm, and the 2 DI 4 over the weekend. All I have to say is WOW!!!!! When I heard it, I was absolutely blown away. I chose the Silkworm over the API every time, and the 2 DI 4 blew everyone in the studio away. Amazing stuff. Good Job Guys!!!!

  • Justin Francis

    Got a chance to use the Creamer+ on a record this past week. Loved what
    it did on my far drum room mics. Mics that I wouldn’t normally look to
    for dynamic range. The amount of gain on input in pentode mode in
    conjunction with the Coles 4038 ribbon mics worked well, with the
    creamer acting as a brick wall limiter of sorts. The results were a
    driven, exciting sound that one would normally seek additional outboard
    gear to attain.

    Next I tried it out in background vocals. A group of 3 girls singing
    around one vintage 251 microphone in omni. Got a nice smoky sound that
    put the BVs just where I wanted them to sit in the track.

    Lastly, I tried it on a fiddle overdub, using the same 251. This was the
    only track I wasn’t gaga over. I think the transients that I needed
    were a bit lackluster, even at the ‘cleanest’ gain settings.

    The project sought a ‘vintage/dated’ sound of tubes and tape, and for
    the most part the creamer delivered. As I am going to be mixing this
    project entirely in the box, I’m going to try running the mix through
    the line inputs for a final touch. We’ll see how it goes !

  • Steve Smith

    It’s not often that I get excited about the hype of a new
    preamp and while I had heard people around me talking about the Creamer I was
    probably like most and just wanted to stick with what I knew and liked (1073).
    A trusted fellow engineer introduced me to Boris and he offered to bring one of
    his toys. At the time we were working on a mix and put the Creamer Plus across the mix buss and well, magic started to happen. It didn’t sound like a 1073 clone, which I liked a lot, there are too many of those. The Creamer glued the mix, gave better separation in the bottom end and removed harshness in a really pleasing way. The artist’s response was “I love Creamers!”

    Since then we’ve recorded acoustic guitars, electric
    guitars, bass, synth bass, and vocals using the Creamer Plus. In particular,
    the Creamer is very useful in getting a well-defined bass sound that will sit
    forward in a mix without muddiness. It’s really nice to have something with 4
    distinct preamp sounds at the push of a button. The triode vs pentode really changes the character and helps with slotting a sound into the overall production right at the recording stage.

    I really love the transformer output and jokingly told Boris he could turn the
    transformer on and remove the button for us. How much did we like it in the
    end? We bought one.

  • ken ‘hiwatt’ marshall

    I press a lot of buttons on any given day…it’s nice when I can CLEARLY HEAR the difference!!! Boris was kind enough to stop by The Commodore Ballroom in Vancouver with his Creamliner. I patched it across the main buss of a Midas Heritage after already EQ’ing the room. While sound checking Skinny Puppy, I pressed the insert buttons on the mains and was blown away at how much it cleaned up the PA! In fact, I actually went back to my 1/3 octave EQ and almost made it flat…particularly in the low-mids where I typically cut fairly aggressively.

    The Creamliner will certainly be in my personal FOH rack for my next tour!!! I can’t wait to hear the CreamerPlus in my studio!!! Thanks Boris 8-)

    Cheers,
    ken ‘hiwatt’ marshall

  • Winston Hauschild

    I’ve been making records in my overdub suite for over 5 years using nothing more than my API 312s. I’ve used the Creamer many times in larger studios but had never given the Silkworm a proper go. I let Boris know I was working on a new EP that would require about 5 days of overdubs and I’d be interested in trying out a couple of Silkworms for the project. Being based in the Vancouver area, and having Sonic Farm so close, is a real treat. Boris willingly dropped off the Silkies and the first thing I did every morning was patch back and forth between the APIs and the Silkworms. On every damn occasion, the Silkworms won. More open sounding, nicer highs and fatter lows (especially in transformer mode). The vibe switch is now essential for me. When switching between an SM7 or a KM184 or a CM48 you can get different high end “vibes” for different mics. So cool!

    When Boris called to pick up the units, I basically said, “no way”. And I bought them.

  • Roger Lee

    I’ve been blessed to have worked with the Creamer+, the Silkworm, and the 2DI4 multiple times (more often than not, all 3 in the same session).

    Many times, the Silkies on drums with the Creamer+ on overheads works wonders… For that matter, everything I’ve tried using the Creamer+ on has brought on magical results.

    Those Silkworms are something else. They gave my drums much more punch over the API 312 pres, as well as my vocal tracks. I was skeptical at first, as my experience with Sonic Farm had been solely tube gear, but I will always remember looking over at the others in the room with my jaw dropped.

    The tone of the DI may or may not bring tears of joy to your eyes. On occasion, I do record acoustic guitar using the pickup and the DI, and I have been guilty of using the DI signal instead of the actual close-mics! It’s truly a wonderful DI, with basically an all in one package (the ability to be able to re-amp as well!)

  • Michael Foster

    I had the opportunity to try out the Creamer+, the Silkworm 500 series, and the 2 DI 4.

    All great sounding, and the wide array of possibilities made them all very usable tools.

    I recorded drums using the Creamer on some ribbons as overheads. The
    gain was great, there is a roll-off in the highs on the mics but driving
    the triode brought out some nice harmonics and made the cymbals sound
    detailed and beautiful. I also used the Creamer+ as a line level driver
    in parallel on my drum kit and I really drove it using the pentode mode,
    I followed that with1176 compression and what a drum sound; huge, rich,
    and vibrant.

    The silkworms are great. The 3 “vibe” eq settings combined with the
    optional SS or output transformer is like having 6 distinctly different
    preamps.

    I am a bass player and one the 2 DI 4 is the best sounding DI I have
    used. It has a lot of colour, but that tube driven in triode mode on my
    Fender precision is “it”.

    I’ve been
    experimenting with bass tones for a long time and thought my chain was
    almost perfect until this DI came into my life. The nature of distortion
    is that you often lose bottom end the more you drive it but the 2 DI 4
    maintains the lows and keeps them tight!

  • Kieran Wagstaff

    Heard nothing but great things about the Silkworm 500 series pre and decided to pick one up to break in my new lunchbox.

    Used the Silkworm to track bass for a project I’m currently working on and was very impressed. Great clean low end without any unwanted hum on the way out. Big fan of the variability of this pre, the Vibe switch, Solid state or transformer output and the precision of ball parking the gain level with the 3-way switch and then being able to fine tune with the knob. Genius!

    All in all a great product, and at a great price too.

  • Seannyluk Zhang

    I’ve been tracking guitars through the 2di4 for few months, it sounded just incredible pure, never felt like this with any di box before. Very dynamic, its just like playing with amps.

  • Ed Johnson

    Using the creamer plus has been very inspiring in the recording process. The creamer plus has been the ‘go to’ pre for all my sessions. I was very happy to have Boris lend one to me last year for a session and now I’m a proud owner of one. Using it on acoustic guitar and doing what I call a ‘double stage pre’ by sending chan 1 to the second channel, has givin me very cool results. I’m loving the pentode/ triode option. You really hear the colorful tone this unit achieves. Thank you Boris and Sonic Farm!!!

  • Ryan Worsley

    Boris was kind enough to lend me the creamer plus. It sounded great on everything I put through it. I have a lot of great preamps at my disposal (neve 1073, api chandler tg2, ua 610) and it held it’s own against all of them. It is also the most versatile sounding preamp I have used. I found it particularly amazing on sources that were harsh or strident sounding. It did a wonderful job of smoothing the upper midrange of vocals and cymbals.

  • Jaret Stodola

    Just picked up a Silkworm after high praise from such great engineers like Kris Seigers and Ken Burke who use them over their APIs! I didn’t believe all the hype they were feeding me so I went out and got one from Boris. When I got home and plugged it in, wow. That’s all I could say. Such fat bottom end and pristine high end without the mud. I’m going to sell one of my other preamps just to pick up more of these. So versatile, this is a ‘desert island’ preamp for sure.

  • Zoran

    Chris Rabold is the FOH mixing engineer that tours with acts such as Lady Gaga, Kenny Chesney, Beyonce, and many others.

  • Bill Henderson

    I have a beautiful old Gibson Hummingbird with an incredible sound, but I’ve never been able to get that sound to translate through any of the pickups and DIs I’ve used. Well, sometimes not too bad, but never great. Boris came down to the Chilliwack gig at the PNE this summer with his 2DI4 and I plugged into it. It was instant. I played a couple chords looked up and said, “that’s the best it’s ever sounded”. Then he generously suggested I take it on the road for a little more test driving, which I did and it never let me down. Fantastic DI! What a difference! I am delighted!